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2007 THEME ART INSTALLATIONS

Click the name of an Art Installation in the list below to see details about it.

A Bouquet of Sunflower Robots
by Stefano Corazza
This is a smaller and more compact version of last year's "A Field of Sunflower Robots". The sunflowers track the sun by day, and getting a solar charge, they glow bright by night, following the lights of burners and sensing their presence.

Contact: sunflowerrobots (at) gmail (dot) com


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America Empowering the World... Again
by Matthew J. Welter
First we encounter massive, contemporary sculptures; refined, subtractive and in the round, all guarding the corners of an elevated platform, where rises an in-progress Statue of Liberty. But now that old fossil-fuel torch is an abstraction of energy, depicted for the poet’s eye, coming straight from Liberty's hand; her head is a perfect sphere, her tablet now a hemispherical shield. Energy and independence are depicted in her gown’s famous folds. America has the means and duty to lead the way into this next freedom—energy independence…independence from oil and power companies, from terrorist nations, and from global climate-change.

Contact: timeless (dot) sculptures (at) gmail (dot) com

Anesthesia
by Rob Buchholz
Anesthesia is something a person dreams about in a deep sleep... beyond the limits of natural sleep but still lucid enough that the organic wraps itself around the unnatural to create a hybrid of nature and urban construction. Tempered glass mosaic glimmers on the surface of giant concrete blocks that serve as a foundation for a 40' tall concrete stainless steel flower sculpture; the flowers support stage rigging for performers. Participants can discover Anesthesia during the day by climbing the roots to the suspended slab and hopefully view spectacular performances at night, in the 9:00 plaza.

Contact: burninghombre (at) yahoo (dot) com

Another Green World
by Nic Valle
Located at Media Mecca, this mural depicts another green world, utilizing classic trompe'loeil techniques.

Contact: buzzcut2000 (at) mindspring (dot) com


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Basura
by Jason M Wright
This sculptural installation represents a visual and spatial examination of recycling as an artistic process. The raw material for this installation consists of drawings, paintings and collage that have been glued to thin plywood paneling. This is the artist's unsold artistic output reduced to fragments and reconfigured into an interactive structure that is inspired by the sand mandalas created by Buddhist monks. As such, process and temporality are central issues in it's construction, as they are to the Burning Man experience itself.

Contact: jason (at) swipple (dot) com


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Bird
by Oona Squire
A single metal bird utilizes the power of the wind to flap its wings and fly.

Contact: Odessa789 (at) yahoo (dot) com


Black Rock Solar Playa Array
by Black Rock Solar
The Black Rock Solar Playa Array is a 30kw solar array that powers the Man and the entire Man Base / Pavillion. After the event the panels will become part of 150kw of free solar being gifted to the Gerlach Public Schools and Pershing General Hospital in Lovelock.

Contact: mota (at) mirthwood (dot) com


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BRC Sewer System
by James Bunkelman
A series of manhole covers is placed along the four main streets leading to the Man.Their presence may cause participants to think about the "sewer system" at Burning Man and the waste systems in their own cities. The manhole covers are made of rubber mats made of recycled truck tires.

Contact: jb (at) galateapro (dot) com

Camp Herring Fjord Installation
by Tor Magnor
This 1:87 scale model of the shore of a Norwegian fjord includes beach life, divers, a small fishing boat and a mermaid.

Contact: elwire (at) gmail (dot) com

Central Park
by Mandy Farnsworth
Offering refuge, Central Park is a sanctuary, a fifteen foot circular green park where one can stop, relax, and observe, drawing back into one's natural rhythm and connecting with nature. This art installation is not about being spectacular; it's about the pause that brings us back to honor the one breath breathing all of us.

Contact: mudmama73 (at) yahoo (dot) com


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Corporate Canopy
by Amy Dockus
This tree is made up of pendant lights which were designed to be sold by a profitable corporation, but which became waste instead.Passersby can stand under the illuminated tree and contemplate the so-called corporate canopy that hovers over us in day-to-day life, having us believe that a world of mass consumerism serves to protect us better than any of our own natural resources.

Contact: oheech (at) yahoo (dot) com


Dionysus
by Scott Bair
The God of Wine and Ecstasy, Dionysus spread the art of tending grapes. He also had a dual side to his nature; he brought joy and divine ecstasy, but also unthinking rage, both reflected in the nature of wine. This Vitis vinifera is made of recycled copper wire and hand crafted aluminum leaves, taking in the sun's rays, allowing life to enter the fruit. When darkness falls this vine comes to life with the vibrant green color of mature bottles of succulent nectar as the young fruits flicker with new life.

Contact: scott (at) carmichaelwd (dot) com

Earth Eye View
by Ben Sarao
A small earthen eye on wheels looks up from the ground and photographically documents how the earth sees us. The iris of the eye is a mosic of small blue crystal glass; the pupil is a fisheye lens that sees 180 degrees and will photographically document the world from Earth's view point. Copyright 2007 Ben Sarao ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Contact: saraoster (at) gmail (dot) com


Equatorial Encounter
by Matt Evans
A polar bear clings to the last scrap of northern ice while a group of penguins, luggage in tow, stare back at him with equal astonishment: a meeting of two species who are normally... literally... poles apart.

Contact: me (at) apple (dot) com

Gate of Tomorrow
by Nic Valle
At the BRC airport, this mural on canvas incorporates classic trompe l'oeil techniques.

Contact: buzzcut2000 (at) mindspring (dot) com


Global Warming
by Bob Marzewski
A 7' diameter earth globe made of 1000 pounds of scrap pallet wood is hollow, to allow burners to contribute flammable personal items. It will be rolled into the glowing remains of the Man.

Contact: bobmarzewski (at) yahoo (dot) com

Glowin' Shrooms
by Roger Hofer
Fungi represent nature's vitally important recycling program, breaking down and filtering toxic substances and decomposing dead tissues into fertile soil. Throughout history mushrooms have been intertwined with mystery, beauty, fear, and even religion, yet many of us have never seen live glowing mushrooms. You will find them in the Mushroom Kingdom installation.

Contact: domitron (at) yahoo (dot) com


Golden Spiral
by Peggy Millar, Skeeter Jones, and Peri Pfeninger
The Golden Mean is found throughout nature-in water, DNA, the proportions of fish and butterflies, trees as well as in art and architecture, music, philosophy, science, and mathematics. This structure based on the Golden Mean produces the Golden Spiral, centered in the heart of a Sequoia Tree. The root of the tree forms the outer wall which creates the spiral. Underneath the tree is an enchanted garden, and inside the tree is an altar.

Contact: millarp (at) surgery (dot) ucsf (dot) edu


Grapestem
by Ben Thompson
The Grapestem is the representation in stainless steel of the remains of a nearly consumed bunch of grapes. Enlarged and enhanced, in an environment where basic sustenance requires thought and preparation, the Grapestem represents man’s primal collaboration with nature—the need for food—with a secondary effect: what remains after consumption is a random structure that invites interaction and tactile enjoyment. The Grapestem recreates and enlarges on the inherent beauty of nature’s randomness, and memorializes and honors the insignificant-seeming detail of our world. The Grapestem reflects the results of the interaction of Man and Nature, and is homage to the accidental beauty that can result.

Contact: benth (at) stobor (dot) com

Grand Plan of F.L.U.F.F.Y.
by DeEtte DeVille
F.L.U.F.F.Y., the plastic rabbit, sits atop his truncated hexagonal pile of rubbish and he's got a message. He's small and cute, but he's fed up with people-trash showing up in his yard. He's got a few ideas about how to make things better, both for rabbits and for people. It starts with living the way the rabbits do: everything is a cycle. Grass grows out of the ground. Rabbits eat the grass. Rabbits poop. Rabbit poop becomes food for more grass. And so on. Maybe humans can use their superior intellect to make all of their endeavors-like convenience foods, intercontinental travel, and health-care sciences, for example-more cyclic. Find ways, F.L.U.F.F.Y. suggests, to make human activities lead to more of the same for generations to come. And remember that throwing something away doesn't take it "away." It's complicated, but F.L.U.F.F.Y. knows you can do it.

Contact: deette (at) withacapitale (dot) com


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Green Duck
by Alice Bain
An open-frame wooden duck with paper-mache beak and eyes is wrapped and tied with strips of green cotton cloth, upon which are written messages, wishes, prayers, and meditations. The hollow belly of the duck contains a meditation cushion, accessed from the rear of the duck.

Contact: albain (at) gmail (dot) com


Greenhouse Project
by Laura Lea Nalle
The Greenhouse Project provides an encounter that serves to reconnect and reawaken participants to take an active part in the universal cycles of life. Through interaction, reflection, and co-creation, participants encounter themselves as part of the movement of the Universe. When we awaken to the fact that we are collaborators with nature, we are more effective in initiating and sustaining beneficial change in our world.

Contact: ll (at) earth2ll (dot) com


Greenman's Doorbell
by Tom Wiltzius
A large steel bell hangs suspended from a timber structure. A blend of harmonic tones dance on and in the bell when struck, rousting the Green Man from his retreat.

Contact: twiltzius (dot) sppc (dot) com

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